Bullet Journaling in Hobonichi Weeks

By now there have been lots of articles and blog posts already written on the topic of bullet journaling. If you’re not yet familiar with bullet journals, first check out the following: the original Bullet Journal system by Ryder Caroll, a comprehensive starter on bullet journaling by Boho Berry, and a short and humorous guide to bullet journaling by Buzzfeed. Each link is set to open in a new tab, so you can either go read those first or refer to them later on. I’ve always wanted to try out the system; I’ve incorporated some elements of it in my previous planning spreads before.

The aim of this post is to show you how to bullet journal in a Hobonichi Weeks. Or rather, I’ll show you how I do my bullet journaling in mine and maybe you can take away some ideas to incorporate in your own.

As you may know, bullet journals comprise of several sections. The beauty of the bullet journal system is the flexibility; you have complete freedom on how you lay out your journal and its components. Using the Hobonichi Weeks in this manner provides a lot of shortcuts since the Weeks already has its own sections. Here’s the basic breakdown of my Hobonichi Weeks as a bullet journal:

  • Monthly calendar – future planning
  • Weekly view – events on the days of the week, weekly task list on the right notes page
  • Notes section – index, collections, daily log

Monthly calendar = Future planning

The monthly view is just what it says. I log a list of events and tasks that will happen months in the future. I refer to the monthly calendar at the start of each week to copy any events that is scheduled for that week into the corresponding weekly view. Having this system also gives me a month-at-a-glance view of my schedule. For events or tasks that don’t have specific dates, I list them at the bottom right of the monthly page so I can remember them during the month.

Weekly view = Weekly planning

The format of this section is simple: events on the left, tasks on the right. The tasks are unfortunately not specific to the days, which sometimes causes me some problems especially for time-sensitive tasks. To address that, I put deadlines on the left as well.

Notes section – Bullet journal

Here is where I consider the bulk of my bullet journal lies. The Hobonichi Weeks conveniently already comes with its notes pages numbered, and even kindly provides an index page.

I have decided to use a pair of facing pages for each week of the year. As I wanted to leave pages for my collections in the front, I started my daily log on page 19. However, since I started using this when the weekly pages started (November 28), this will only give me enough to last until week 22 of 2017. It’s not really a big deal, since I had already bought the supplementary Hobonichi Weeks notebooks which I plan to use when the notes pages run out. On the daily entries, I use the rapid logging system to mostly list down the things that happened during the day that I thought needs recording. I put my bullet legend on a sticky note that I just transfer to the current week.

After about six weeks of doing this, I find that the two-page spread is indeed enough for one week, with space to put some decorations should I wish it. I really like the look of decorated pages, so I do put in as much decorations as I feel could fit around the entries. I use a combination of pens, stickers, washi tape, and stamps for my decorating. Here is a sample of a completed decorated page, which usually matches the design of the weekly spread for that week.

Notes section – Collections

In the pages before the “daily pages” I put enough space for the collections that I want to keep for the year. A good example would be my wishlist (which I try to minimize as much as possible!) and my order tracker which gives me an idea of which packages are still pending and how long I wait for each to arrive.

My other collections include a 2017 Goals page, a book recommendation list, and a list of my TNs.

 

So far I feel that this system is working very well. The way I see it, the weekly pages tell me what I plan to do for the week while the bullet journal at the back tells me what happened during the week. The decorations keep me interested and look forward to each week, without making me feel like I need everything to be perfect. In fact, I do get a lot of mistakes in this book which I either just cross out with a red ink or use a correction tape. As the readings I linked say, the idea of a bullet journal is that it should be a tool that suits your purpose and its versatility is its strength. Take advantage of it and shape your bullet journal the way you like it!

 

5 thoughts to “Bullet Journaling in Hobonichi Weeks”

  1. I’m glad that I came across your blog post via Google. This year decided to try Bullet Journaling in the Weeks but hadn’t found many people doing the same. (I’m also using the same adorable Meow Meow Meow version.) I like how you’re using the notes section for rapid logging. I hadn’t thought about that. Happy planning. 🙂
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